Monthly Archives: November 2015

How to Recover from a Sinus Infection Faster

Young blonde female blowing her noseA sinus infection, otherwise known as sinusitis, can leave you feeling pretty miserable. The sinuses are pockets in the forehead and face that produce normal mucus to keep you healthy, as well as moisten the air you breathe. When the sinuses get inflamed, they’re not able to perform their usual functions, and this sometimes results in infection.

Symptoms

There is a range of symptoms that someone with a sinus infection might exhibit. These include:

  • a runny nose
  • congestion
  • coughing
  • sneezing
  • headache
  • fatigue
  • bad breath
  • sore throat
  • fever
  • pressure or tenderness around eyes

Not everyone has the same symptoms, and these symptoms also vary in severity dependent upon the individual.

Home Remedies

Often, sinus infections will improve on their own with time. To help alleviate symptoms, there are a number of measures you can take.

  • Use nasal saline
  • Apply warm heat
  • Breathe in steam vapors from the shower
  • Drink lots of fluids
  • Flush out sinuses
  • Rest
  • Use decongestants as needed
  • Use over-the-counter painkillers as needed
  • Drink tea
  • Eat spicy foods
  • Avoid cigarettes

When to See a Doctor

If your sinus infection isn’t going away with home remedies, you may need to see a doctor. If you have any of the symptoms below, call your doctor’s office for guidance.

Symptoms that don’t improve after seven to 10 days

  • Green, yellow or bloody mucus
  • A high fever
  • A strong headache not improved by OTC painkillers
  • Ear pain
  • Stiff neck
  • Severe neck pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Heaviness in the chest
  • Vision changes, swelling or redness around eyes
  • An allergic reaction to medication
  • Chronic sinusitis

Medical Treatments

About 2 to 10 percent of sinus infections are bacterial, and these can be treated with antibiotics. A doctor may also want to perform allergy testing to see if that is what’s causing your sinusitis, especially if it’s chronic. If you do have allergies he or she may prescribe or recommend certain allergy medications. Inhaled steroids are sometimes used to reduce inflammation. Lastly, surgery may be an option, if you continue to have bouts of sinusitis. You may need a procedure that enlarges the sinus passages and removes blockages.

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When Should You Keep Sick Children Home From School?

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One of the most difficult decisions that a parent or care giver needs to make is to decide when a sick child needs to stay home. For many parents this decision may be made worse by the fact that their child may frequently complain of ailments just to skip school. Here some ScannerDoc tips that should help you make a decision.

Find the Answers

When should you keep sick children home from school? This question can be answered by first considering three simple questions. Firstly, you need to think about your child’s symptoms. Is it possible that they will keep her from participating in school activities? Next, if your child is contagious, then your decision is already made for you. Finally, consider if your child may need more care and supervision than the school can provide.

Doctor Speak

One of the most common ailments that afflict children is the flu. In fact, when it comes to the flu, school children are the most affected. The disease is contagious and easily spread in the classroom environment where children frequently come in contact with a sick child.  This is why pediatricians recommend the flu vaccine. Though many parents worry about the effectiveness of the vaccination, better vaccines that match the flu virus in circulation are being developed.

Some of the common symptoms associated with the flu include runny nose, cough and fever. ScannerDoc recommends that parents keep their children home from school if they have a fever of over 100. In addition, symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea are indications of the contagious phase of the illness.

In other words, if the child has a temperature of over 100, is vomiting or has a tummy upset, then it is best for her not to go to school. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the CDC recommends that children stay away from school at least 24 hours after the fever subsides.

If a child suffers from an ailment that is not contagious, such as an injury, it is best to consider how comfortable she may be at school. If medication may resolve the situation then it would be quite alright to continue with the usual routine. If you still find it difficult to make a decision, we recommend that you speak to your pediatrician.